Pasta Cat (not to be confused with Taco Cat): School Craft

Yesterday, I posted our 300th blog post and didn’t realize it until the afternoon! Thank you to everyone who has been with us since the beginning and thank you to those who have joined us recently. We are hoping to regularly post now that we are settled into our new home. I know that 300 posts really isn’t much for a 4 year old blog but it’s still good to celebrate the milestones, right?

So this is one of those kind of silly, filler posts. But hopefully it will still be fun!

My fourth child, Rhys, had an assignment a few days ago in his science class to make a dinosaur out of pasta. Now, this is one of those fun crafts that I knew the other kids would be interested in! So when I prepared the materials, I made sure to prepare enough for four of the kids to make a picture. Corran’s too old for pasta pictures and Gavin is too young and would just try to eat the uncooked pasta. Yuck!

Pasta pictures is a school craft that most moms and dads know about but I’ll list materials anyway. It’s definitely one of those crafts that you already have most everything you need already! I had three types of pasta and was wishing I had elbow macaroni for them to use, but the kids worked with what I had.

  • Pasta, the more shapes and sizes the better
  • White glue, the squeeze bottle type probably works best
  • Cardstock, since it’s stiffer than construction paper, it holds up better to the weight; cardboard would also work
  • Imagination (does anyone else hear Spongebob’s voice when they think of the word “imagination?” No, it’s just me? I’m weird I guess. Or I have kids who like Spongebob.)
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Weekend Build: Lego Carousel

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My last post was about the Booster Bricks subscription we bought our kids for Christmas. It is not just a box of random Legos though. The box includes challenges as well as an online Facebook group to participate in: weekly challenges, builds, and games.

This past weekend’s challenge was to build a Lego Carousel. Two of my boys, Matthias and Ian, worked pretty hard on it so I thought I’d post about it here.

For Christmas, we also bought our kids one of the largest Technic sets currently available: The Bucket Wheel Excavator. At almost 4,000 pieces, this is a huge set. We have to confess that we bought it mostly for the pieces. My boys used some of those pieces in their Carousel, which is why it looks a bit skeletal.

Matthias and Ian used a medium motor to power the Carousel. The gear assembly is pretty simple. The circular yellow pieces form a large gear.

You can see the gear and motor assembly inside the walls in the picture above. The switch is located outside the walls.

The Carousel sits on the small gear attached to the motor as well as 3 flagpole pieces that help keep the Carousel level but still allow it to rotate.

I was really proud of my boys for keeping at this build. They had no instructions and only a little bit of help from Josh. He helped them figure out how to downgear the motor so the Carousel wouldn’t spin too fast.

Here is a quick video of their Carousel in motion!

They didn’t mess with the design element too much but that is ok with me. I’m more interested in their learning the mechanics of it. Design can come later!

-Lynn

Learning About Science By Growing Radish Seeds: Day 5

I have fallen behind, and this is from Friday’s work.

On this day they used two of the small pots they made earlier. One of the little pots had 12 of the sprouted seeds put in it. This is to show the effects of overcrowding plants.

Another mini pot had 2 sprouted seeds put into it.

So far this has been an interesting experiment. I think it goes over many of the things that people do wrong when planting seeds. Ranging from overcrowding to water issues.

-Joshua

Learning About Science By Growing Radishes: Day 3. Light and no Light.

This is the third post about two of my children’s school science activity. They are growing radish seeds in a variety of conditions to see what happens. This is from Tops Learning Systems.

On day 3 they started an experiment to see how seeds grow with and without light. They put a seeds on a damp paper towel in a clear covered cup. One of the cups has been completely wrapped in foil.

The seeds will be in these cups untouched for 17 days. After which, the boys will see how these conditions affect the growth of the seeds.

-Joshua

Learning About Science By Growing Radishes: Day 1/2

In the introduction post to this topic, I just said the kids were doing this activity. It is actually just the 10 and 8 year old.

On the first day they made mini planters out of cardboard juice boxes.

Inside there is a wet paper towel. The towel has circles with numbers in them. A seed is placed on each number.

I took these pictures on the second day, and they have already started to sprout.

On day two they made something to show different growing environments.

Basically, it is a cup with paper towels in it. The towels are inside of water in the cup. There were three seeds put directly in the water. Three seeds on a paper towel. Three seeds on a paper towel wrapped in plastic wrap. Lastly, there are three seeds on the cup’s lid with no water.

They also made planters to plant seeds in the dirt. Currently, there are seeds in the planters marked 2a and 2b.

They are pretty excited so far to see what is happening with their seeds. It has been a lot of setup to get all of this done. Now they are entering more of a monitoring stage.

-Joshua