Pomegranate Syrup

In November, I wrote a blog post about making pomegranate jelly. I gave a small jar of that jelly to a neighbor who invited us to their party. The neighbor has a friend with a pomegranate tree that produces a lot of fruit that they weren’t using. Our neighbor knows that we love pomegranates so he bagged up a bunch of them for us!

I had already made enough jelly for the year so I wanted to do something different with this batch of fruit. After quite a bit of thought I decided to make pomegranate syrup. I figured this would be something that could be used for multiple different applications.

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Pomegranate Sorbet

This post started at the end of last year, then life got real busy. It ended up sitting in the draft posts for about a year. Now I am finally finished with it.

This was the third year we have gotten fruit from our pomegranate tree. Each year we have had more fruit. This year I picked 56 pomegranates.

Since they are picked ripe, we need to use them quickly or else they will rot. One of my favorite things to make when I have a lot of juice is sorbet. I like the concentrated fruit flavor, and our children always ask for me to make it.

I didn’t want to use my usual sorbet recipe, because I usually make citrus based sorbets which need a lot of sugar. Pomegranate is fairly sweet on its own. I had issues finding recipes online that I liked. Most of them used other juices in addition to pomegranate, used a lot of water, or way to much sugar. The closest to what I wanted is this recipe from Williams-Sonoma.

While that recipe is close, it does have a few issues. First, it uses corn syrup. Pomegranate and sugar are already sweet together, and don’t require corn syrup. Second, the amount of juice required isn’t very specific. What does 12 pomegranates mean? Some of mine were massive, and a few were tiny.

So, I reworked the recipe a little to fit my needs. Please click the post title Pomegranate Sorbet above to see the recipe.

Pomegranate Sorbet

 

 


 

-Joshua

Pomegranate Jelly

One of my favorite things that I planted at our house in California was the pomegranate tree. It really liked the weather there and grew quickly. Last year we had just over 50 pomegranates off the tree. We made a variety of things with those to see what they were like; the favorite of everybody though was pomegranate jelly.

I only made six jars of the jelly and they were gone in a couple months. Since we had moved from that house I figured I would not be able to make that jelly again this year.

Thankfully, my job sent me to the house of an older lady with an overloaded pomegranate tree. Most of the fruit had split already and was attracting bugs. I was able to get several grocery bags full though.

My wife, oldest two sons and I removed the arils from the skin. We got enough to fill a large bowl.

The next step is to remove the juice from the arils. Pomegranates are pretty crunchy because there are a lot of seeds; I don’t like the jelly to be crunchy.

Even though the fruit has a skin I always rinse the insides before using them. Sometimes the skin has little cracks that allow bugs in. I don’t think a gnat or fruit fly floating in the jelly would make my wife happy.

My basic technique to remove the juice is to put some of the arils in the blender, and pulse them until they mostly appear broken.  Then I dump them in a sieve over a large bowl, and push out the juice.

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Pomegranate harvest!

At our old house in San Diego, we had a pomegranate tree that we loved. Of course, when we moved here, we lost out on our annual supply of pomegranates, though Josh does plan on planting a pomegranate tree here when he has a chance to clear an area for fruit trees (apple trees! There should be enough freeze hours here).

Josh’s job takes him to a lot of houses and last week, he came home with four grocery bags full of pomegranates! What a treasure! One of his clients had a 50-year-old pomegranate tree in her yard. The fruit was splitting on the tree and Josh mentioned he liked to make pomegranate jelly. The client said he could take all of the fruit that hadn’t split because she doesn’t use them anymore.

So Josh came home with a bunch of ripe pomegranates that we needed to seed right away.

It took us about an hour and a half and we made a big mess, but we ended up with a huge bowl of pomegranate arils!

Our plans for this bowl of pomegranate arils? As many jars of pomegranate jelly as Josh can make! Because they go really quick with our family.

-Lynn