Bathroom Remodel – Vanity Total Cost

I thought it might be useful though to outline the costs for the entire vanity area and where the materials came from. The only professional installation was the vanity countertop. Josh and my father-in-law installed everything else themselves. I have posted costs before but so many things changed between that post and the final product that it is probably best to have the “after” also!

Let’s start at the top of the vanity area!

  1. Two Trendscope pendant lights – from Home Depot – $76.50 each – $153 total
  2. Two Classic wall mirrors in Satin Nickel – from Restoration Hardware – $185 each – $370 total
  3. White Hutton Medicine cabinet – from Restoration Hardware – $169
  4. White wall cabinet – from Lowes – $75
  5. Moon Jewel mosaic tile – from Tilebar.com – $19.95/square foot – total cost for vanity area: $220
  6. Titan quartz prefabricated countertop in Sierra Ice – from Stoneville USA – $345.60
  7. Fabrication and installation of countertop – $300
  8. Two Kraus 15″ square ceramic sinks, two Kraus Ramus faucets in satin nickel, and two pop up drains in satin nickel – from Home Depot – $520
  9. Cabinet hardware – from Dixieline – $28
  10. Refinishing of vanity – $30
  11. Plumbing (I am really estimating here since I am not sure how much Josh spent on the plumbing.) – $50
  12. Drywall repair, Electrical – $125
  13. Vanity decor – from San Diego Rustic Imports and Michaels – $75

Total estimated cost for the entire vanity area:  $2450

I am going to assume that labor probably would have almost doubled this amount so we saved a lot of money by Josh and father-in-law doing most of the work themselves.  It took them a lot of Saturdays to do it though!

My current estimate for the total bathroom remodel is $5000, though I will not be surprised if this goes up because you never know what you will find behind a wall or underneath the floor!

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Bathroom Remodel – Part 4 – Demolition

 

I was going to try and put all of demolition into one post but for some reason, the posting feature went on the fritz for me. Oh well. I will just put it here in a new post then. These pics are all from January 2015.


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My FIL taking out all the old tile on the vanity. The tile was mortared to the plaster wall behind it.
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The vanity area after the plaster wall and tile was removed.
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The tile surround on the bathtub was also removed.
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The hole in the bathroom ceiling. We’re still not quite sure why there was a soffitt here. My son Ian hated this hole. He was scared to use the bathroom because of it. To be honest, I didn’t like it much either! The ceiling was like this for about two weeks.
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The new lighting! These helped our bathroom look so much brighter than it was. It kind of looked like a cave before!
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The new ceiling light
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The pendant lights were actually pretty tricky for my FIL to install. I think this was because he was starting from scratch with the housings and the wiring.

-Lynn

Bathroom Remodel – Part 3 – Demolition

Note: The first half of this post is Josh’s writing. I wanted to get demolition all into one post and it looks like we didn’t do that over on our old blog.


The first big remodel project that I have chosen to do is the bathroom.  It is incredibly ugly and needs to be updated and brought out of the 50s and 70s.  Just before Christmas I took the old wall coverings off.  Rather than paint this bathroom was done in wood slats.  It wasn’t exactly paneling, but was instead some unfinished wood nailed to the wall.

Before removing all the wood, I often wondered why somebody would put wood slats on a bathroom wall.  I was able to look under the wood a little bit and see dark gray paint with some shiny gold showing through the paint.  After taking down the wood, I found the walls had been covered in gold foil wall paper.

Unpainted gold foil wallpaper behind toilet

As I removed the wall paper, I was able to see yet further into the past.  Under the wall paper was yellow and pink paint.

It was fun to remove all the ugly parts of the past in my bathroom.  It was interesting to me to see what it looked like in the past.  Nothing had been taken out in the entire 60 years of the house’s history.  Everybody before me just covered up and moved on.  While that created more work for me, it did give me more insight into my house and the decorating ideas of the past.

-Joshua