Preserving Beans By Freezing

This year the green and wax been plants have done very well.  We have eaten beans much more often then the children would prefer.  I have also given bags of beans to my parents.  However, there were still multiple gallon zip lock bags of beans in the refrigerator.  Since we had so many beans on hand I decided to freeze some of the beans.

The first step is to clean the beans and remove any damaged sections.  I had a few beans that had some spots where bugs had helped themselves to my beans.  There were also a few beans that had touched the ground, and had sections that didn’t look nice.  This is also a good time to remove the ends of the beans were they had attached to the plants.

For me the second step is to cut the beans into smaller sections.  I make them as close to bite size as I can.  Since these beans were fresh, I was able to just snap them into pieces.  You could do this at the same time you remove the unwanted parts from the beans.  I don’t do it that way because I have a way of mixing the unwanted parts with the good beans.

Breaking the beans into pieces
Beans broken into sections

While you are breaking up the beans you can start some water boiling.  You will probably need a big pot if you have a large number of beans.  Put enough water in the pot to cover the beans you are going to put in it.

Boil the beans for about 3 minutes.  This process is called blanching.  I don’t fully understand the science behind this process, but somehow it helps the beans preserve better.  It helps preserve the color and texture of the beans during the freezing process.

After 3 minutes, remove the beans from the boiling water and quickly put them into ice water.  This stops the cooking process, so the beans don’t get over cooked.  You still want them to be mostly crispy when they are frozen.  This will give them a better texture when cooked later in the year.

After the beans have cooled, they need to dry.  I usually just leave them in a strainer for awhile.  They can also be laid out on a cookie sheet.  They don’t have to be totally dry, but you don’t want to put them in the freezer soaked.  If there is a lot of extra water, then you will end up with ice.  To much ice can cause freezer burn over time.

I separate the beans into bags based on how many we will use for a meal.  Remove as much air as possible from the bag, seal the bag, and place into the freezer.

Beans are an easy vegetable to preserve, and the process doesn’t take much time.  At the end it is satisfying for me to be able to save some of what I grow for later.  That is less vegetables we will need to buy later  the year.

-Joshua

Wednesday in the Garden: 06/28/2017

Our weather in the past week has been a bit of a roller coaster.  For instance, on Monday the temperature was around 100 degrees F and today was 78 degrees F.  I think these ups and downs are going to have a negative effect on some of the plants.  I know that the really hot days made a few plants unhappy.

In spite of the weather changes, the garden is growing well.  We have a number of things that we are harvesting and eating right now.  In particular we have green and wax beans to pick just about every day.  We also have more chard then we can use, which is nice because I have been able to share quite a bit of it with my mom.

My daughter’s flowers are growing well, especially the snap dragons.

The pumpkin plants are over spilling their area and growing everywhere.  I don’t think they like the heat very much, and are starting to look fairly wilted.  Hopefully a few cooler days will bring them back to life.  I think I could get some pumpkins out of the plants right now if they died off.  However, I would prefer to allow the pumpkins to ripen on the vines.  Last year we had our pumpkins ripen towards the middle of July, so that is what I am aiming for this year.

I am thinking I will be able to pick some of the Desi Squash in the next couple of days.  They taste quite a bit like zucchini, but are round rather then long.  I do have to be careful not to let them sit to long, because they quickly go from good to tough and woody.

I think these plants seeds came from a packet that was marked as Desi Squash, unless I planted the wrong thing.  However, they are very different looking plants.  As you can see from the picture above the Desi Squash is bushy in nature.  They plants below are vines and want to trail up things.  I am wondering if they are some kind of melon.  I guess I will just have to be surprised at what we get.

We are getting many green and wax beans. I have been able to give quite a few to my parents, while still having enough for us to eat often.

The 3 apples on our Anna Apple tree are getting to be a good size.  I don’t know how long they take to grow and how large they will get.  I am having fun watching them grow though.

My 10 year old son’s garden bed is doing well.  I have been able to get quite a bit of chard from his bed, and a couple of carrots.  I probably picked the carrots to early, but they tasted really good.  Store bought carrots are not nearly as good as home grown.  His melon plants have gotten very large, and have started to put on melons.  He is excited about those, because he really likes melons.

Our 13 year old son’s garden bed is still doing well.  His flowers have done well, and have a number of beautiful blooms on them.  His corn has ripened and we picked it today.  I will have a few pictures of that later.

I picked the rest of the beets and the corn from my 8 year old’s garden bed.

I hadn’t realized that our corn had gotten ripe until last night.  I was probably a couple days late picking the corn, but it was really hot this weekend so I didn’t get around to checking.  Unfortunately, most of the ears had a caterpillar in them.  The caterpillars hadn’t had much of a chance to eat the corn yet, so I squish them and then cut of the chewed up parts of corn.  The unaffected parts look really good and I can’t wait to eat them.

I have harvested some things throughout the week, but today I did a pretty good sized harvest.  My parents are watching the oldest two boys tonight, so I wanted to give them some things.  I was able to pick the corn, arugula, chard, beans and mustard leaves.

Tonight for dinner Lynn made pancit using all vegetables from our garden.  There was garlic, red and orange carrots, green and wax beans, and kohlrabi.  I get a feeling of accomplishment from growing enough plants to do a whole dinner.

-Joshua

Wednesday in the Garden: 04/12/2017

Today there will not be as many pictures as last week. While working in the garden, I had my two oldest come to cull their plants. I wanted them to cut out the extra plants that came up with some scissors. I guess I gave my nine year old bad instructions or he miss understood. His beet seeds produced a few plants per seed. I wanted him to trim each spot where the beets came up to only one plant. He thought I meant every square that he had planted. So he cut most of his beets and many of his carrots down. After I discovered what happened some crying happened, and I now felt like the worst dad in the world. I helped him replant where needed, and now I have to hope his plants still do well before the summer heat kicks in.

So here are the pictures I did get to take.

Our lemon tree is doing well so far this year.  I think Lynn is going to need to do a bunch of baking with lemons in the near future.

The Pomegranate tree continues to put out flowers.  I think we will have many fruits from this tree this year.

I am experimenting with strawberries in one of my raised beds.  There is some fruit on them, but I am mostly hoping they survive the summer.  I want to get runners off the plants and have a raised bed full of strawberries.

This celery plant took a long time to sprout.  I had planted it in the fall, but it took months to finally start to grow.  I like the color of the stalks because they are such a vibrant dark green.  The celery from the store is always so much more pale then this. I wonder if that is because they are a different type of celery or just that the store bought is picked to early.

They pansies that we planted have started to grow.  I never grew these plants from seed before, so I am interested to see how they look as they grow.

Our square foot garden raised beds are starting to look really good.  This is such a good way to grow a garden in the urban/suburban setting.

Hopefully, next week I won’t have my son kill his garden so there will be more pictures. I hope all of you that read this are having success with your gardens, and that you enjoy many tasty fruits and vegetables.

-Joshua

Save